7 thoughts on “Welcome to my Moreton Bay world”

  1. laurie petersen said:

    Hello Peter (Please direct to Peter Ludlow as appropriate)

    My name is Laurie Petersen. I grew up in Wynnum and I have spent a lifetime on the Bay but that is not specifically why I write

    My Mother-in-Law Joyce Munnich is currently writing a novel (story based around facts) surrounding the Myora/Minjeriba area. This will be her third novel. She is a very active 90 year old..

    I feel you could provide some help. She has already read all she can find of your publications.

    I continue to advise Joyce on her work. She is a stickler for accuracy and I don’t have all the answers.

    Can you help?

    It would be great to meet with you. Her home at Wynnum North or a place suitable to you

    regards

    Laurie
    laurie.petersen@bigpond.com
    32068138

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  3. I did a count have 8 people buried there you have the names of 3 of them and your kanaka may make 9 (1 child included)

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  4. Jennifer Banks said:

    Hello Peter,

    I’m looking for any information on Peel Island relating to the time my grandfather worked there as a store man. I would estimate that he was there around the “1930’s’ but I know very little of his life there. His name was John Carling. I have been told that a housing development in Raby Bay has a lot of streets named after workers from Peel Island and there is a Carling Court there

    I appreciate any help you may be able to provide.

    Jennifer Banks

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    • Hello Jennifer,
      sorry for the tardy reply. I have searched my notes and here is everything I have found:

      J.E.Carling’s name appears as either witnessing or certifying burials at Peel Island between 19 April 1932 and 29 March 1939.

      * When I first arrived at Peel in 1936, the present Ranger’s house was occupied
      by Superintendent Goldsworthy, Deputy Superintendent Jack Carling, and the
      housekeeper, Mrs Snow. It was out of bounds to myself and the other patients. This
      visit was the first time I had been allowed to enter the house. Nurse Dwyer then
      occupied the (later) Superintendent’s house.
      [Extract from Moreton Bay People – The Complete Collection (Peter Ludlow)]

      His first task was to report to the elderly Nurse Dwyer at the single roomed
      surgery. There was no hospital then, and Nurse Dwyer, assisted by one of the male
      patients, handled all medical emergencies. In 1936 Nurse Dwyer lived in what was
      later to be known as the Superintendent’s quarters, and the Superintendent
      Goldsworthy and his deputy, Carling, in what was later to be the nurses’ quarters.
      [Extract from Peel Island – Paradise or Prison (Peter Ludlow)]

      The year of 1938 also saw the retirement of Superintendent Goldsworthy
      and the appointment of Sr A.E.0’Brien to a newly created position of Matron-In-
      Charge. Alex remembers Matron O’Brien as a ‘stand-over merchant’ and her habit
      of carrying a revolver could only have added to this image. By her efforts she
      managed to obtain the appointment of two more nurses for the hospital, but on the
      negative side Matron O’Brien made things difficult (in Alex’ words) for the ageing
      Nurse Dwyer, who resigned. The same treatment also probably befell the Deputy-
      Superintendent, Carling, who left soon after.
      [Extract from Peel Island – Paradise or Prison (Peter Ludlow)]

      1925 John Carling Assist. superintendent (from 15.6.25)

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  5. Jennifer Banks (née Carling) said:

    Thank you Peter. I have been able to establish through my grandmothers diary that he arrived in Australia a few years after returning from the Great War and found the job on Peel Island at least 12 months before my grandmother brought their 3 children over on the long crossing by boat. They established themselves in Lota, with my grandfather only returning every few weeks on recreational leave. She writes how hard life was on the island and how she missed him. She was alone in a new world.

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